Culture

Emcee Cormega “Industry” Juice Crew Rmx Featuring Craig G, Masta Ace & Kool G Rap

Thursday • January 22, 2015 • BY noiseman
Emcee Cormega

As the online community grows, those who know, the rebirth of hip-hop music has been experiencing a golden age renaissance in the last five or ten years. Beautiful and expressive hip-hop music has been coming out of every corner of the world. I often wonder, do fans of commercial artists like Jay Z, Rick Ross and Drake know about this organic hip-hop music? In 2015 with up-tempo being the “in thing”, would they appreciate the music right out of the carton? Fresh squeezed, not from concentrate. Hitting the underground hip-hop scene in 2014, if you didn’t know, now you know, classic Cormega Juice Crew Remix – “expiration date never”.

We’re talking about the kind of music you can dip through the set with, dance at the club to, or just chill with your peoples on a Saturday afternoon. Produced by one of the originators, hip-hop aficionado Large Professor dose an excellent job chopping this uplifting sample. Contrasted with dope break-beat style drums, this is that golden era rebirth music. Just straight up good hip-hop music that goes with anything.

Complimenting his discography, is this “Industry” remix single by Cormega. This classic remix release is featured on his 2014 album, Mega Philosophy. On the project, Cormega hosts the family reunion between Craig G, Masta Ace and Kool G Rap. We recommend adding this one to your playlist, no doubt it’s timeless music. Legendary Queensbridge Juice Crew members Craig G, Masta Ace and Kool G Rap drop knowledge on the current state of hip-hop music. Speaking on rap’s rise from the South Bronx, to main-stream wash-out, the Juice Crew’s MO is all about that straight up science, industry rule number 4080.

Cormega “Industry” Juice Crew Remix Featuring Craig G, Masta Ace & Kool G Rap| Audio Stream

Published on July 2014: Cormega “Industry” Produced by Large Professor, Released by Slimstyle Records, Audio Stream via Sound Cloud | Respect Magazine.

About Cormega | via iTunes: An underground and critical favorite, Cormega was the rare hardcore rapper to win praise from all directions, and while he never quite crossed over like some of his New York City peers, he maintained a respectable independence over the years nonetheless, self-releasing his work on the Legal Hustle label. Born Cory McKay, Cormega grew up in the same Queensbridge housing projects that were home to a generation of rappers, most notably Nas, Mobb Deep, AZ, and Tragedy Khadafi, and a previous generation that famously included Marley Marl and the Juice Crew.

Following some early guest appearances on releases by DJ Hot Day (e.g., “Set It Off” on PHD’s Without Warning, 1991), Cormega did time, which put his rap career on hold for a few years. In 1994, Nas mentioned him by name on Illmatic, on “One Love” (“And night time is more trife than ever/What up with Cormega, did you see him, are y’all together?”), and upon Cormega’s release from jail in 1995, he was featured as a guest on Nas’ second album, It Was Written (1996), on “Affirmative Action” with AZ and Foxy Brown. Plans were made for a group — named the Firm, led by Nas, with production by Trackmasters and Dr. Dre — that would reprise the collaborative nature of “Affirmative Action” over the course of an album. Cormega was excluded from the project, however, replaced by fellow Queensbridge rapper Nature. A rift between Cormega and Nas resulted, leading to some bitter exchanges over the years (the two later patched up their differences, reuniting to perform “Affirmative Action” with Foxy Brown live on-stage in December 2006).

Also upon his release from jail, Cormega signed a recording contract with Def Jam that seemed promising at the time. During 1995-1996, he went about recording his debut album, The Testament, with such producers as Sha Money XL, Havoc, Jae Supreme, and Hot Day. Def Jam never released the album, unfortunately, and Cormega was forced to wait out his contract, which didn’t expire until 2000. In the meantime, he made rare appearances, including features on the How to Be a Player soundtrack (1997), Mobb Deep’s Murda Muzik album (1999), and Nas’ QB Finest compilation (2000). Finally free of his Def Jam contract, Cormega founded his own independent label, Legal Hustle, and, via a partnership with Landspeed Records, released his debut album, The Realness (2001), comprised of newly recorded material. The album was critically acclaimed and peaked at number 111 on the Billboard 200 (more tellingly, number four on the Top Independent Albums and number one on the Top Heatseekers charts). A second album followed, The True Meaning (2002), and was likewise critically acclaimed, earning Independent Album of the Year at the Source Awards in 2003. The album cracked the Top 100 of the Billboard 200 (peaking at number 95).

Cormega then took some time off to raise his daughter, born in November 2002, before he resumed music operations. In 2004, he returned with Legal Hustle, a collaborative album, and Special Edition, a two-fer including both The Realness and The True Meaning. In 2005, he released The Testament, his unreleased Def Jam album from ten years prior, to which he had recently secured the rights to the master tapes, and in 2006 he was co-featured on My Brother’s Keeper, a collaborative album also billed to Lake, a fellow Queensbridge rapper of some renown. In 2007, Cormega released Who Am I?, a DVD documentary covering the time period of 2001-2005; a CD soundtrack comprised of newly recorded music was included as well. Also in 2007, he released Got Beats?, an instrumental show featuring an impressive roster of producers, including DJ Premier, the Alchemist, Ayatollah, and Ski Beatz.

Artist Contact Info:
Cormega | Twitter | Instagram
Craig G | Twitter | Instagram
Masta Ace | Twitter | Instagram
Kool G Rap | Twitter | Instagram

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Article: Big Noise
Editor: Noiseman
Image: Cormega